2017.10.29 - 2017.10.29

Panel discussion: Parodies, caricatures and stereotypes

How can we recognise and understand derogatory and clichéd images? How do the historical anti-Semitic caricatures relate to today’s Mohammed caricatures or Charlie Hebdo’s satirical drawings?

In the first decades of the 20th century, satirical magazines were an essential ingredient in both emerging mass culture and in political debate. In this context anti-Semitic images of “the Jew” as a “race type” that was different from the majority of population were also firmly spread and contributed to the creation of hatespeech. Throughout the exhibition format, the Biennial presents a selection of such pictures from the Swedish daily press published between 1903 and 1921, aiming to show the rise of stereotypical portrayals in moments of extreme nationalism and explain the mechanisms of stereotyping that we see today.

How can we recognise and understand derogatory and clichéd images?
How do the anti-Semitic caricatures of yesterday relate to today’s Mohammed caricatures or Charlie Hebdo’s satirical drawings?
How can we deal with a visual history based on anti-Semitism and racism without repeating it?
Who can – and can’t – show these kind of images and whose freedom of expression should be protected?

These and much more will be discussed by Lars M Andersson, Senior Lecturer in History at Uppsala University and author of the thesis En jude är en jude är en jude: Representationer av "juden" i svensk skämtpress omkring 1900-1930; Moa Matthis, PhD in Literature, author, journalist and editor of the website Kunskapsbanken Bilders Makt; Tobias Hübinette, doctor in Intercultural Pedagogy at Karlstad University and responsible for the Research Network for Swedish Critical Race and Whiteness Studies and for the research project Racializing Sweden: Narrative Constructions of a New Swedishness. The discussion will be moderated by Lena Ulrika Rudeke, literary critic and curator Göteborgs Stadsteater.
 
In association with Folkuniversitetet. 
 
When: Sunday, 29 October, 2 pm
Where: Röda Sten Konsthall